Analyzing the Purpose of Starbucks Training

Starbucks training and values

Dan Pontefract gave a good rundown of the recent continent-wide racial-bias training that Starbucks developed and delivered in record time. Starbucks reacted in an exemplary manner, but has the training achieved the goal?

Unless we tacitly agree that the actual goal of Starbucks was to stomp out the public-relations wildfire, their expensive exercise has not changed anything. Not exactly a knee-jerk reaction – but far from being effective in resolving the actual problem.

Here’s what I would consider – if Starbucks want to live up to their image of the “third place”.

Update your mission statement.

Your mission statement is more important than you may think. This is your overall Goal, your Purpose. It drives your staff, so it better be clear to them. I would leave the second, the “neighborhood” part of the Starbucks current mission statement – but would definitely clarify the first half in such a way that it becomes meaningful to their staff AND customers.

Align regional and individual store KPIs with the new mission.

How would you measure your progress otherwise? So far, there’s nothing better than revenue and cost of sales. No wonder that the only available “indicator” of the recent nation-wide training effectiveness was the estimated cost of lost sales. How do you know if the situation has improved?

And Starbucks NEED to monitor the situation now because many scientists openly state that Mandatory Implicit Bias Training Is a Bad Idea. Even the founding fathers of the approach, psychologists Anthony Greenwald and Brian Nosek are very skeptical because there is no scientific evidence that these programs work and make a lasting positive impact on behaviors. Indeed, the impact of such a ready-made, one-size-fits-all training may be harmful. It is more complicated than SJWs would like to admit.

Even if we assume that the training has some positive impact, it is far from what Starbucks needs in the longer run.

If you train your child saying “Hi” to your neighbor, it will not automatically make him gentle with his sister and respectful with Grandma. Instilling behaviors that deny racial differences will not correct other problems like sexism, ageism – basically all “-isms” – that will inevitably manifest themselves and cause further problems to Starbucks, now that the company is in the spotlight.

What will work then?

Whether we like that or not, our unconscious biases are the core of our survival mechanisms that so far helped us survive as a species. They are in our genes. Being earthly creatures, we will not eliminate them because they help us process the incoming information through patterns etc. In fact, you are using your unconscious biases while reading and understanding this text.

We may be able to bypass or at least tone down some of our biases naturally. For Starbucks, that will mean creating the right environment within the shop teams. These teams must be aligned (a) internally and (b) with their immediate neighbourhood (where most of the customers coming from). Internal alignment and the appropriate cultural, gender, racial, age mix will decrease the subconscious, or implicit, reaction to all ‘outgroups’ as psychologists call them – i.e. people who are “not like us” – as we gradually adapt to our immediate work environment.

It is a long and tedious process. It needs to be initiated by the corporate leaders as it starts with a clear company mission.

PLACE YOUR STAR ON HUMAN VALUES MAP

CLCTVR 2.0

 

CLCTVR 2.0 tool will show your “true North” and get you aligned with teammates, colleagues and friends.

In other words, the tool will help you see what drives you and your team and if those drivers are aligned. Continue reading “PLACE YOUR STAR ON HUMAN VALUES MAP”

The Recipe for Project Success: 3 Requirements + 10 Values

success values

The three key reasons why some projects fail are:

  1. Requirements
  2. Requirements
  3. Requirements

There is but a grain of joke in this PM joke: requirements are key. In real life, three different sets of requirements could and should be identified during the project initiation.

Requirements-1: The Spec.

First requirements that come to mind are the “standard” ones: what exactly we have to deliver. If the “what” is not defined properly, different interpretations of the requirements will lead to reworks, conflicts, delays etc.

Although requirements definition and requirements management is an important part of the PM’s job, it is important to go one level higher and make sure that we understand the business context.

Requirements-2: The Constraints Triangle.

If you’ve read this far, you are probably not new to the project management. Hence you know that the triple constraints – Scope, Time, Cost – are part of PM life, and that another PM not-exactly-a-joke insists that you can pick only two. Continue reading “The Recipe for Project Success: 3 Requirements + 10 Values”

Shared Values of Self-Made Millionaires

Human Values

There’s an interesting article posted recently on LinkedIn Pulse. Jeff Haden put this in his post headline, making it almost instantly viral:

“8 of 10 Self-Made Millionaires Were Not ‘A’ Students. Instead, They Share 1 Trait.”

The trait, of course, is their willingness to learn.

While I agree with Jeff Hadden, that is not news. Similar observations were made before.

According to Tom Corley’s study of “Rich Habits”:

“85% of millionaires read two or more books a month that help them grow.”

Indeed, Elon Musk, one of today’s most admirable business leaders is known for having taught himself – literally! – rocket science by reading books. Moreover, according to his brother, Elon used to read two books per day when he was a kid. Continue reading “Shared Values of Self-Made Millionaires”

Elon Musk Q7

Elon Musk Q7

A few months ago, I answered this question on Quora: “How can Elon Musk put in 80-100 hours a week and still have a social life or time for exercise, etc.?” My answer collected an incredible number of views and upvotes – a good indicator that this is (A) a hot topic and (B) my answer makes sense to many.

The answer I have for you today may be even more interesting. In part, this is your answer!

Here’s the scoop. (TL,DR version: go to Elon Musk Q7 questionnaire).

Personal efficiency, effectiveness, success – have been my favorite subjects and areas of research for quite some time. A few years ago, when I launched the Collectiver site and online tool, the objective was to find out why some teams are more efficient than others. According to my research and observations as a performance expert, the best-performing teams have significant internal alignment. That alignment I measure by the basic values’ congruence of the team members. Continue reading “Elon Musk Q7”

Canoeing with Mintzberg

Canoeing with Mintzberg

The CoachingOurselves Reflections 2017 – Rebalancing Society conference was an outstanding 3-day event filled with ideas, presentations and passion shared with us by the brightest minds: Henry MintzbergPhilip KotlerDan PonterfractEd ScheinJonathan GoslingMitch Joel and many other prominent thinkers, businesspeople and coaches.

This true feast of sustainable leadership was concluded with a savory dessert – The Great Canadian Canoe Trip, five hours in double canoes going down the Devil’s River in Mont-Tremblant National Park.

Now, mentally going through the experience again, I think that this trip in the end of the conference was more than just for pleasure and relaxation. The unbridled nature, the canoes, and the river flow – all have their profound role in the understanding and “internalization” of the worldview experienced during the main event.

Here are my key takeaways from the Canoe Trip.

1.      Key safety rules in the canoe are familiar to every manager:

  • Avoid sudden movements.
  • Go with the flow.

Nothing new, but that does not mean “don’t rock the boat”; it’s just that any disruption creates unnecessary risks and may lead to an accident, and is not necessary when you are on the right course.

2.      The real leader in the canoe, the helmsman, is the paddler in the stern. He is the more experienced one, doing the steering. Leading from behind, he will be looking over the front paddler’s shoulder all the time, and if the latter does not have a small frame and wears a hat, the helmsman will not see much. Continue reading “Canoeing with Mintzberg”

How can Elon Musk put in 80-100 hours a week and still have a life?

(Originally answered on Quora)

Most probably you want to share your surprise that Elon Musk, who reportedly stayed overnight at Tesla site on many occasions, still looks and behaves like a normal sociable person, gives interviews and is altogether in good health and good spirits, right?

This is because he is fortunate enough to have a solution to the ageless dilemma of “work-life” balance.

For most people, this problem exists, and exactly in this form – work vs. life – implying that the negative portion of your existence, called ‘work’, is balanced out by the positive ‘life’. When the balance is in place, then the negative impact that work leaves on your personality and health is cured by the positive emotions you get from what happens after work. Or that is how the unfortunate majority sees it.

 There’s not much of an overlap between the Life and Work, and as this overlap is not considered healthy, we are advised by holistic gurus that we must disconnect, shut off etc. and not mix the two. Hence, there’s not enough room to have both, we either displace one at the expense of the other, or meticulously separate them, having not enough of either as a result. The rest is a multitude of ‘chores’, neutral in their nature; we just take them for granted, neither good nor bad. Continue reading “How can Elon Musk put in 80-100 hours a week and still have a life?”

Reflections 2017 Global Conference

Reflections

To learn more about the critical role Leadership Development professionals play in society, come to the Rebalancing Society Event, hosted by Henry Mintzberg, Philip Kotler, Mitch Joel and many others.

““Leadership, like swimming cannot be learned by reading about it.” Henry Mintzberg.

Register to see Henry and other thought leaders at Reflections 2017 Global Conference!

Dan Ponterfract: “FLAT ARMY”

Required Reading

Over the weekend, I have read Dan Pontefract’s book “Flat Army.” I was looking forward to reading an inspirational text about change management, corporate culture improvement and employee engagement, but the book appears to take the reader further. Continue reading “Dan Ponterfract: “FLAT ARMY””

Was Starbucks’ venture into Lean useless?

Lean Six Sigma vs Starbucks

I received a few messages with this question in reply to my original article.

My answer: Not at all. Continue reading “Was Starbucks’ venture into Lean useless?”