Tag: organizational change

How to Make Sure Your Improvement Initiative Fails

How to Make Sure Your Improvement Initiative Fails Burning Platform Company Meeting

As a performance improvement expert and organizational change specialist, I affirm that the following principles are ultimately reliable and guarantee the expected outcome: 1. Send an unexpected mass email to all or call an all-hands meeting to tell the entire company that “we are on a burning platform.” 2. Hire a consulting company and tell […]

The 4-Day WorkWeek: The Good the Bad and the Ugly

The 4-Day WorkWeek: The Good the Bad and the Ugly (c) S. Brovkin

Recently, some major news media, many bloggers and numerous readers were delirious about the findings of several “four-day week” trials in the UK and Iceland (with more countries across the world joining in). Researches inform that those trials were an “overwhelming success,” with quite a few workers having moved to a shorter week while “productivity […]

Applying the Pareto Principle to the History of Project Management

Applying the Pareto Principle to the History of Project Management

Fresh from the camera – Lesson 2 on Project Management 2.0: The History of Project Management as We Know It. Applying the Pareto principle to Project Management history, we can safely conclude that it consists of three major milestones. Watch Lesson 2 – and let me know if you disagree. Good people from a fledging […]

When you have a health problem, do you see a specialist?

When you have a health problem, do you see a specialist?

When you have a health problem, you see a specialist. You don’t ask “Hey, you don’t have diabetes, how can you tell me what to do?” When you have a legal problem, you see a lawyer. You do not ask the lawyer if he has ever been divorced or – better – had a felony […]

You Don’t have to be Steve Jobs to Run Meaningful Meetings

You Don’t have to be Steve Jobs to Run Meaningful Meetings

Last week, I attended a meeting at an organization that I will not name here, although they will hardly ever read this because everybody in the organization is “crazy busy.” No wonder: about 20 people attended the meeting, half of them dissolved soon because they were “triple-booked,” and no decision or minutes followed, of course. […]