Weekend Easy Reading – Healthy Quote from the New York Times

Easy ReadingGood article in The New York Times: “A Positive Outlook May Be Good for Your Health”

If you are too busy to read it in full,

here are the skills one must learn, and practice each day:

■ Recognize a positive event each day.

■ Savor that event and log it in a journal or tell someone about it.

■ Start a daily gratitude journal.

■ List a personal strength and note how you used it.

■ Set an attainable goal and note your progress

■ Report a relatively minor stress and list ways to reappraise the event positively.

■ Recognize and practice small acts of kindness daily.

■ Practice mindfulness, focusing on the here and now rather than the past or future.

And, of course, contribute to universal health, share the good content with your friends and contacts.

A Leadership Dialogue with Brian Fetherstonhaugh

Brian Fetherstonhaugh

Integrated Management Symposium Series: Authenticity and Deception in Communications and Advertising

Great event at McGill University. Amazing speaker and a great book!

Once again, highly recommended reading – to children from 15 to 65.

Brian Fetherstonhaugh: The Long View.

 

Brian Fetherstonhaugh: “The Long View”

Required Reading

Over the weekend, I have read a very interesting book – “The Long View” by Brian Fetherstonhaugh.

Brian Fetherstonhaugh is the Chairman & CEO of OgilvyOne, but the book is not about marketing. It is a thoughtful but clear feedback on his personal career experiences, supported by “business cases” from the careers of other successful individuals. Continue reading “Brian Fetherstonhaugh: “The Long View””

Weekend Easy Reading: Inspirational Quote

Challenge quote

I could not find the author of this quote. But it is simple and memorable. And printable.

 

 

Negotiate Out of Anything

Negotiation Skills Help With Police

Ever realized that negotiations play a major role in your life?

What to eat for breakfast, where to go for vacation and how to get a discount, as well as your starting salary, your promotion, and eventually your severance package – those are but a minor sample of the items that you have to negotiate daily, whether you recognize this fact or not.

And do not forget such things as speeding tickets or court hearings: things happen. Even when you have nothing to lose (the cashier erroneously charged you full price for a discounted item), it will take you considerably less time to get your money back AND rip the possible benefits, if you know the rules of the game. Continue reading “Negotiate Out of Anything”

Leaders’ Digest One-Page Essentials: A Corporate Primer

Corporate Sharks

This is an old classic dating back to late 18th century. The author, Voltaire Cousteau, is allegedly related to both Francois Voltaire and Jacques Cousteau. The text was translated and turned into a dinner talk in late 1970ies by a French scientist working in the US. Perhaps the guy moved from science to management and realized that quite a few “natural laws” are applicable in the corporate world.

It has been abridged to fit on one page, downloadable and printable as a handy one-pager. Continue reading “Leaders’ Digest One-Page Essentials: A Corporate Primer”

Why Do We Call Them ‘Leaders’?

Leaders HBR

Interesting article in HBR, and by a respected author.

I would argue though that the problem does not exist. Or should not.

But why do we call them ‘leaders’ in the first place? We do not have to. Nothing’s wrong with ‘managers’ or ‘administrators.’

This is just another case of semantic escalation albeit widespread and severe. To cope with the problem, we must avoid glorifying the administrative positions that may have some control over our careers.

In most cases, we are talking about ‘position leaders’, i.e. about the lowest level of the leadership hierarchy – leadership by appointment, at best, leadership by permission, as per John Maxwell’s description.

Only a small percentage of them will ever make it to the higher leadership levels. But those who make it will be called leaders by their teams and not by HR (or by themselves). And rarely will they think that they’re better than they actually are, because they have other things to care about.

Make Every Minute of Your Life Count Towards Your Goal

My Goal

If you want to be efficient, you must work towards your goal – always.

Even if you are chatting with a colleague about last weekend’s BBQ, you should have a goal.

Perhaps your goal is to have a short break before you get back to work. But you must be consciously aware of this intermediate goal and make sure that it is leading you towards your Goal. Of course, you may need to stop and think what your main Goal is.

One of my teachers, when he was doing his advanced degree, had the tagline “PhD in 3 years!” inscribed literally everywhere around him. He even had it as his screensaver text popping up on the monitor after a few minutes of inactivity. It helped.

This poster will help you make your day – your week – your life – more efficient.

Download poster as pdf.

What Makes Life Worthwhile? Good People Made Better

What Makes Life Worthwhile

Once in a while you get news that makes your life worthwhile.

Last week a colleague sent me a text with the phone number of a former client: “He wants to speak with you.”

I called the new mobile number right away and learned that Vlad has been promoted to the top position at an oil production (E&P) company. For a professional, this is an incredible achievement!

Continue reading “What Makes Life Worthwhile? Good People Made Better”

Coaching Ourselves May Be the Way Forward

CoachingOurselves.com

I attended an interesting webinar – “Peer-Coaching Groups with CoachingOurselves: A modern approach to developing leaders.”

Peer coaching with professional facilitation is an interesting concept. Although I did not hear Henry Mintzberg ever mentioning this, but it reminds me of the Quality Circles. They were popular in Japan in 1950s-1960s, made popular in the West by W. Edwards Deming especially in relation to Toyota.  Not a surprise that CoachingOurselves’ success story (still ongoing) is about their program at one Japanese company.

If you want to know more about the concept and the program, check out their website and youtube channel.

Highly recommended to managers who want to become better but cannot afford a coach. And Henry Mintzberg’s ideas are always interesting and thought-provoking (read: good for self-improvement).